Listen to your Heart – Croí Webinar on Heart Valve Disease

Join Croí for a free Heart Valve Disease webinar on Thursday, September 16th from 7-8pm.

As we get older, the valves in our heart can become diseased or damaged. Heart valve disease is common, serious, but treatable. Heart Valve Disease Awareness Week is taking place from September 13th-19th, and Croí want to raise awareness about the common symptoms of heart valve disease and encourage the public to listen to their heart!

Register for our special Heart Valve Disease webinar here!

The “Listen to Your Heart” webinar will feature contributions from interventional cardiologist, Dr Samer Arnous, and James Penny, who is living with heart valve disease. MC on the evening will be Lia Hynes, Journalist with the Irish Independent, author and podcast host. The webinar will highlight the signs and symptoms of heart valve disease and how it is detected and treated. Members of the public will have the opportunity to put their questions to Dr Arnous.

  • When: Thursday, September 16th, 2021
  • Time: 7-8pm
  • Location: Online over Zoom
  • Price: FREE

Living well with Cardiovascular Disease: Emotional Recovery

Have you, or a loved one, recently been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease or are recovering from a cardiac event? Join Croí, the Heart & Stroke Charity, and leading experts for a public webinar on the emotional recovery post cardiac event or diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. The free webinar takes place online using Zoom on Thursday, August 26th, from 7-8pm.

Register now and submit your questions for the experts at www.croi.ie/webinar, or call Croí on 091-544310. Don’t miss this special event – Croí want to help you to regain your confidence and get back to living your life again.

Living with cardiovascular disease can be very difficult. At times, you may feel unsure of what to expect or limited by tiredness and pain, and this may cause feelings like sadness and hopelessness. The interactive panel discussion will address your priorities and concerns. Experts on the night include Noelle O’Keeffe, Senior Counselling Psychologist and Professional Coach, Tallaght University Ireland; and Dr. Lisa Hynes, Health Psychologist and Head of Health Programmes, Croí.

“It is normal to feel down or depressed after a cardiac event like a heart attack, a heart surgery or procedure, or a new diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Many people with CVD will experience psychological distress, particularly depression. With support and treatment, it is possible to recover from depression and take care of your heart health,” says Dr. Lisa Hynes.

Register now at www.croi.ie/webinar, or call Croí on 091-544310.

Secondary prevention of heart attack and stroke in Europe: consensus report

CVD is Europe’s biggest killer and a leading cause of unplanned hospitalisations, with millions suffering a heart attack or stroke every year. Less well known is that many of these are repeat events, happening among those already known to be at high risk. It is well proven that many such events are preventable with the right package of specialised acute care, structured rehabilitation and long term management.

However, a new report has revealed the scale of systemic gaps and inequalities in CVD prevention and care for these high needs groups. This is driving significant healthcare costs and many avoidable hospital admissions, yet heart attack and stroke appear to be largely deprioritised at policy level, with few countries maintaining formal plans or strategies to tackle entrenched systemic failures and improve long-term patient outcomes. The report, ‘Secondary prevention of heart attack and stroke in Europe’, was developed by The Health Policy Partnership, with input from an Advisory Panel of leading European experts in CVD prevention, including patient representation from Croí. The pan-European summary report is accompanied by 11 country profiles exploring the national situation in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain and the UK.

 

Read the report now.

Patients Voice Concerns over COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritisation

Croí joins Patient Organisations to Urge Government to Prioritise People with Chronic and Rare Diseases, of All Ages, in Rollout of COVID-19 Vaccines

A coalition of patient organisations, including Croí, has today written to An Taoiseach and to the Chair of the High-Level Task Force on Vaccination and Immunisation to urge that people with chronic and/or rare diseases, of all ages, be treated as the highest priority in determining early vaccine recipients. Already, many countries around the globe are including this group as a top priority and it is vital that Ireland likewise recognises the importance of doing so.

The coalition is also calling for representatives from the public to be allowed join the membership of the Task Force and for patient organisations and vulnerable group leaders to be urgently engaged in dialogue.

The coalition of fifteen patient organisations comprises: Alone, Alpha 1 Foundation, Asthma Society of Ireland, COPD Support Ireland, Diabetes Ireland, Disability Federation of Ireland, Family Carers Ireland, Irish Cancer Society, Irish Heart Foundation, IPPOSI, Mental Health Ireland, The Neurological Alliance of Ireland, Rare Diseases Ireland, Sage Advocacy, and The West of Ireland Cardiac and Stroke Foundation.

Vaccination Priority

Derick Mitchell, Chief Executive of IPPOSI (the Irish Platform for Patients’ Organisations, Science and Industry), comments:

“Many chronic and/or rare disease patients manage one or more life-threatening and/or life-limiting conditions. Many have been cocooning since news of the pandemic broke in early 2020. This has had devasting effects for patients and their families – emotional, physical, and financial.

“These are patients who cannot participate in the ‘new normal’ in any way, they cannot ‘risk it’. They cannot rely on social distancing, on mask wearing, or on hand sanitising. To protect their physical health, they must cocoon or self-isolate – completely, indefinitely, and some alone.

“Patients have endured this level of isolation for ten months now and it is critical that they not endure this for a moment longer than is absolutely necessary. We strongly urge the Government and the High-Level Task Force to consider the needs of some of the most vulnerable in society, of all ages, when making its final decisions as to what groups will receive immediate vaccination priority.”

Task Force Membership

Vicky McGrath, Chief Executive of Rare Diseases Ireland, comments:

“The welcome developments announced in recent weeks by several COVID-19 vaccine candidates are forcing us as a society to address some difficult questions.

“As things stand, dialogue and decisions around the priority groups in line for future COVID-19 vaccines are being taken by a select number of departmental and public authority officials. The 15-member task force includes the Department of Health, the HSE, the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Innovation, the Health Regulatory Authority, the IDA, the Dublin Airport Authority, but not a single representative from the public, or from patient or vulnerable groups. We are therefore calling for the appointment of two representatives from the public to join the membership of the Task Force and for patient organisations and vulnerable group leaders to be included in an ongoing dialogue.”

Kieran O’Leary, Chief Executive of Diabetes Ireland, adds:

“We all recognise that, at least initially, there may not be enough vaccines for a widespread immunisation programme. Demand between countries, and within countries, will outstrip supply. Nationally, we will have to prioritise who receives the first allocation of vaccines.

“Allocation must be made on the basis of agreed ethical values and clinical evidence, in a transparent and accountable environment, where public, patient and vulnerable group representatives are able to voice the perspectives of the most at risk in our society.”

Distressing Time

Benat Broderick, Cystic Fibrosis patient advocate, shares:

“As a person living with Cystic Fibrosis, the pandemic has left me with no other choice but to cocoon since early February, due to the risk posed to my personal health. As others have benefitted from an easing of restrictions or a return to a new normal, I however, continue to endure a very worrying and draining set of circumstances. My only hope of re-joining society in any meaningful way, is access to a vaccine. I therefore fully support the call for patients and vulnerable people to be placed among those in the highest category for vaccination.”